What India can learn from Qiddiya (the Kingdom’s entertainment city)

Saudi Arabia is a country rich in geographical and cultural diversity. They always try to plan and build things that amaze all of us. In the year 2017, they announced the construction and set up of Qiddiya, also known as the kingdom’s entertainment city.

What is Qiddiya?

It’s one of the most popular and awaited projects of Saudi Arabia. The public investment fund of Saudi has announced plans to construct the Kingdom’s largest sports, cultural and entertainment city for the people.

It is named Qiddiya as it’s situated in Al Qiddiya, which is on the southwestern side of Riyadh. It is also planned that approximately 4000 residential houses will be built by the year 2025 and the numbers will increase every year.

It’s built over 377 square km of land and is planned to have six different styles of theme parks, water parks, an F1 racing track, athletic stadium, creative corner side, artistic activities and many more.

What is the purpose of Qiddiya?

The CEO of Qiddiya stated that this project is one of its kind, with huge investments.

It’s expected to give a boost to the countries economy, which currently depends on oil primarily.

It’s planned very carefully and tactfully. The purpose is not just to attract tourists but also provide a great alternative to the residents, so they don’t leave the country to spend. The Qiddiya construction was planned to direct all the tourism and keep them intact in the kingdom only.

So what can India learn?

  • A similar project can boost the economy, create jobs and opportunities and invite investments.
  • It can also be a good opportunity to showcase Indias rich cultural heritage.
  • It can boost the tourism sector significantly and also inspire youngsters looking to try different things.

Qiddiya can be an inspiration for India, and building something similar can not just boost the economy and create jobs but also boost the sports and entertainment sectors.

India to soon introduce next-gen ePassport for citizens with a microchip

Sanjay Bhattacharya from Ministry of External Affairs, took to Twitter to inform them that India would soon get e-passports with secure biometric data.

  • The passport would contain secure biometric data.
  • It would ensure smooth passage through immigration posts globally.
  • The e-passport would be ICAO compliant.
  • And would be produced at India Security Press, Nashik

What is an e-passport?

  • e-passport will be a replacement for the traditional passport. It will have an electronic chip that carries the same information as the printed passport like name, date of birth etc.
  • The e-passport could be scanned, which will speed up the verification process at the immigration counter.
  • It will also help curb the fake passport business. Any tampering with microchip will result in failure of passport authentication.

How BarefootCollege is Solving India’s Electricity Problems

The ultimate solution for fighting poverty in India was not mass production but production by the masses – Mahatma Gandhi

We have to apply the Gandhian model to solar-electrifying villages – Bunker Roy

Bunker Roy is the Founder and Director of Barefoot College. His dream was to establish a Rural College in India that was built by and exclusively for the poor.

How Barefoot is trying to solve the Electricity Crisis in India

The School trains Barefoot Engineers – people from Rural areas who don’t get Electricity.

This is done using color-coded parts and hands-on lessons. After six months at the peaceful campus in the northwestern state of Rajasthan, the new technicians return to their home villages, bringing with them solar power equipment and know-how.

They’ll install solar panels, charging stations, and small LED lights in houses, and they’ll stand ready to deal with breakdowns.

While these systems offer only the most basic amenities of modern life, they also bring independence from India’s dysfunctional national power grid.

The Barefoot College began its pioneering work to bring off-grid solar power to India’s villages in the 1990s.

The program initially enrolled men, but these students proved disinclined to return to their villages once they had marketable skills.

When the school began recruiting grandmothers instead, the program took off. This very literal campaign of rural empowerment shows the untapped potential of women.

Despite being uneducated they have the skills and the intelligence.

You can read more about this initiative here

Barefoot College Website

Image Courtesy